“Labour is not a commodity.” But the pressure of piece-rate wages, quotas and fear ensures it is.

“Labour is not a commodity.” But the pressure of piece-rate wages, quotas and fear ensures it is.

The Declaration of Philadelphia adopted on 10 May 1944, reaffirmed and defined the aims and purposes of the International Labour Organization (ILO) established in 1919. The very first article declares:

(a) labour is not a commodity;

The Declaration came at an important historical juncture, marking the beginning of the end of colonialism for many countries struggling for independence. In many newly independent countries the remnants of colonialism would continue in language, education, law, borders, land ownership, as well as structures of governance. Colonial practices would also continue in various forms of racism, discrimination, slavery, and bonded labour, as well as grand corruption. (1)

One of the practices that would also continue to flourish is the system of piece-rate wages and quotas, designed to compel workers to work harder to produce more. Understood in modern industry as a system of rewards and incentives – and in the current gig economy and tech world as opportunity and self-employed privilege – the piece-rate wage system is rooted in labour discipline. It is designed to compel workers; to extract more from workers.

The effectiveness of this system is that it appears as though workers are working harder to extract more from themselves. So the thinking goes, workers are pushing themselves to meet targets and quotas, producing more and more pieces of whatever the piece-rate wages are designed to produce. The compulsion to do this is justified by employers as nurturing the inherent competitiveness of humans, often misusing Darwin’s “survival of the fittest” to justify this. (2)

For hundreds of millions of workers this compulsion – this relentless pressure – has not changed. The pressure exerted by piece-rate wages and quotas stems not from an internal desire to compete, but merely to survive. This occurs because workers and their families are denied both a guaranteed living wage and the social protection needed to ensure access to decent health, education, housing and food & nutrition, and a better quality of life. As we have explained elsewhere, piece-rate wages and quotas are a key driver of child labour.

The pressure created by piece-rate wages and quotas has a devastating impact on workers’ health.

Under the pressure of piece-rates, quotas or targets, workers work beyond their physical limitations. Excessive workloads and long working hours without rest or food are as common to plantation and farm workers and meat industry workers as it is to workers in luxury hotels and fast food chains around the world. Quotas, targets and piece-rates drive workers to work longer than they physically should. Their brains and nervous system tell them to stop working and rest. Their body sends repeated signals (i.e. pain). Quotas tell them to ignore all this and keep going. (3)

The time needed to meet quotas or earn enough wages through piece-rates becomes critical. It is so critical that workers must forgo rest breaks, meal breaks and toilet breaks, and push themselves beyond their physical limits. Indeed, in an effort not to lose time and reach their targets, workers are compelled to abandon occupational health and safety measures, increasing the risk to their health and to their lives. When under pressure from piece-rates or quotas, workers cannot stop to put on personal protective equipment or carefully follow safety instructions because they are losing income at that point. The greater the need for that income, the greater the risk.

Employers ignore the effects of piece-rates and quotas and instead blame workers for working unsafely. Instead of guaranteeing living wages through collective bargaining and redesigning workloads to be done safely in eight hours, employers introduce all sorts of training … and all sorts of punishment. It is a deeply disturbing irony that even the biggest companies in the world compel workers to shortcut health and safety under the pressure of piece-rates and quotas then introduce complex systems of punishment for these shortcuts.

There can be no doubt that as climate change leads to rising temperatures, there will be greater risk of heat stress or heat exhaustion and hyperthermia (4). If workers cannot stop for rest breaks to drink water, seek shade and rest now, then imagine what it will be like in the next two decades. In these conditions, the pressure of piece-rates and quotas will kill many more workers.

Ultimately it’s about fear. Fear of not earning enough or fear of losing their jobs is what compels most workers who are dependent on piece-rate wages and quotas. There is also fear of being blamed, of “letting the team down”, which generates significant mental stress. In fact, for many young workers I’ve met, fear of being blamed for not working hard enough or letting the team down outweighs their fear of losing their job. Yet for many employers it seems that this fear is the lynchpin of their modern employment practices.

Seventy-seven years after the Philadelphia Declaration, we should question why we are not making enough progress. Labour is very much a commodity and one of the factors that sustains this is the pressure of the piece-rate wage system, quotas and targets. This is pressure that relies on fear and the absence of a living wage and social protection.

Overcoming this fear and the absence of a living wage and social protection may in fact depend on the second principle declared in the Declaration of Philadelphia on 10 May 1944:

(b) freedom of expression and of association are essential to sustained progress;

It’s time to start making progress.

Dr Muhammad Hidayat Greenfield, IUF Asia/Pacific Regional Secretary

Hotel housekeeping workers in the Philippines protest “room quota kills!” on International Workers Memorial Day, 28 April 2018

Notes

  1. Grand corruption is corruption at the highest levels of government and/or corruption among holders of public office that undermines the fundamental rights of a people or a particular social group. See for example Transparency International’s legal definition of grand corruption.
  2. The concept of survival of the fittest refers to a biological concept of reproduction in a particular natural environment. “Fitness” refers to the rate of reproductive output among a specific class of genetic variants. So Darwin was referring to how some living organisms are better designed for an immediate, local environment than others and how they adapt. It has nothing to do with competition or competing. As it is used today, survival of the fittest is simply an excuse for the unfair or inhumane treatment of others, justifying why they are left behind. Obviously biologists have moved on since 1869 and scientific thinking has fundamentally changed. Corporate thinking hasn’t.
  3. It remains a common practice for employers in several industries to provide or encourage various kinds of “pain killers” for workers. This also dates back to colonial times when opiates were used widely as part of the work regime. It often formed payment in kind and addiction to opiates led to debt and bondage. The use of pain killers today is widespread in the poultry processing and seafood processing industries, for example, where in-house doctors or nurses are only permitted to prescribe or provide pain killers and must advise workers to keep working. Pain killers of course only kill the signals the body is sending us to stop and rest. The compulsion to keep working of course comes from the piece-rate and quota system itself.
  4. Hyperthermia refers to dangerously high body temperatures that threaten our health.

 

“Hard bargain” – translations of an interview with Mark Lauritsen, IUF President

“Hard bargain” – translations of an interview with Mark Lauritsen, IUF President

Image/photo credit: Meatingplace October 2021

This interview with Brother Mark Lauritsen, International Vice President of the the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) in the USA and global President of the IUF, was published in the October 2021 issue of the red meat and poultry processing industry magazine, Meatingplace. In “Hard bargain”, Brother Mark speaks about the struggle of meat processing workers, his personal experience of these struggles, the central role of human rights in our fight, and what freedom of association means for workers.

The IUF Asia/Pacific team translated the interview into Bahasa Indonesia , हिन्दी Hindiاردو Urduবাংলা Bengali and ភាសាខ្មែរ Khmer.

These are unofficial translations.

POSTER: “what we fear as women”, we fight as a union! International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

POSTER: “what we fear as women”, we fight as a union! International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

English

Bahasa Indonesia

日本語 Japanese

繁體字 Chinese [traditional]

簡體字 Chinese [simplified]

ภาษาไทย Thai

ភាសាខ្មែរ Khmer

ဗမာဘာသာစကား Burmese

ဘာသာမန် Mon

ကညောကလော် Karen

Jing hpaw ga

ရခိုင်ဘာသာ Rakhine/Arakanese

လိၵ်ႈတႆး Shan

Tagalog

हिन्दी Hindi

বাংলা Bengali

اردو Urdu

سندھی Sindhi

پشتو Pashto

नेपाली Nepali

සිංහල භාෂාව Sinhala

 

> English

English PDF

> Bahasa Indonesia

Bahasa Indonesia PDF

> 日本語 Japanese

日本語 PDF

> 繁體字 Chinese [traditional]

繁體字 PDF

> 簡體字 Chinese [simplified]

簡體字 PDF

> ภาษาไทย Thai

ภาษาไทย PDF

> ភាសាខ្មែរ Khmer

ភាសាខ្មែរ PDF

> ဗမာဘာသာစကား Burmese

ဗမာဘာသာစကား PDF

> ဘာသာမန် Mon

ဘာသာမန် Mon PDF

> ကညောကလော် Karen

Karen PDF

> Jing hpaw ga

Kachin PDF

> ရခိုင်ဘာသာ Rakhine/Arakanese

Rakhine PDF

> လိၵ်ႈတႆး Shan

လိၵ်ႈတႆး Shan PDF

> Tagalog

Tagalog PDF

> हिन्दी Hindi

हिन्दी PDF

> বাংলা Bengali

বাংলা PDF

> اردو Urdu

اردو PDF

> سندھی Sindhi

سندھی PDF

> پشتو Pashto

پشتو PDF

> नेपाली Nepali

नेपाली PDF

> සිංහල භාෂාව Sinhala

සිංහල භාෂාව PDF

POSTER: Union Power Must Protect Women Speaking Out! International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

POSTER: Union Power Must Protect Women Speaking Out! International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

English

Bahasa Indonesia

日本語 Japanese

繁體字 Chinese [traditional]

簡體字 Chinese [simplified]

ภาษาไทย Thai

ភាសាខ្មែរ Khmer

ဗမာဘာသာစကား Burmese

ဘာသာမန် Mon

ကညောကလော် Karen

Jing hpaw ga

ရခိုင်ဘာသာ Rakhine/Arakanese

လိၵ်ႈတႆး Shan

Tagalog

हिन्दी Hindi

বাংলা Bengali

اردو Urdu

سندھی Sindhi

پشتو Pashto

नेपाली Nepali

සිංහල භාෂාව Sinhala

> English

English PDF

> Bahasa Indonesia

Bahasa Indonesia PDF

> 日本語 Japanese

日本語 PDF

> 繁體字 Chinese [traditional]

繁體字 PDF

> 簡體字 Chinese [simplified]

簡體字 PDF

> ภาษาไทย Thai

ภาษาไทย PDF

> ភាសាខ្មែរ Khmer

ភាសាខ្មែរ PDF

> ဗမာဘာသာစကား Burmese

ဗမာဘာသာစကား PDF

 > ဘာသာမန် Mon

ဘာသာမန် Mon PDF

> ကညောကလော် Karen

Karen PDF

> Jing hpaw ga

Kachin PDF

> ရခိုင်ဘာသာ Rakhine/Arakanese

Rakhine PDF

> လိၵ်ႈတႆး Shan

လိၵ်ႈတႆး Shan PDF

> Tagalog

Tagalog PDF

> हिन्दी Hindi

हिन्दी PDF

> বাংলা Bengali

বাংলা PDF

> اردو Urdu

اردو PDF

> سندھی Sindhi

سندھی PDF

> پشتو Pashto

پشتو PDF

> नेपाली Nepali

नेपाली PDF

> සිංහල භාෂාව Sinhala

සිංහල භාෂාව PDF

“Hard bargain” – translations of an interview with Mark Lauritsen, IUF President

مشکل سوداکاری” آئی یو ایف کے گلوبل پریزیڈنٹ برادر مارک لاریسن کے ساتھ ایک انٹرویو”

Image/photo credit: Meatingplace October 2021

PDF Brother Mark Lauritsen interview URDU

یہ مضمون میٹ انڈسٹری میگزین، میٹنگ پلیس کے اکتوبر 2021 کے شمارے میں شائع ہوا۔ یہ یو ایس اے میں یونائیٹڈ فوڈ اینڈ کمرشل ورکرز کے بین الاقوامی نائب صدر  اور   آئی یو ایف کے عالمی صدر برادر مارک لاریسن کا انٹرویو ہے۔  برادر مارک میٹ پروسیسنگ کے کارکنوں کی جدوجہد، ان کی ذاتی تاریخ، انسانی حقوق کے مرکزی کردار، اور انجمن کی آزادی کے حقیقی معنی کے بارے میں بات کرتے ہیں۔

فکری رہنما

پیٹر تھامس ریکی

سخت سودا:

یو ایف سی ڈبلیو کے مارک لاریسن گوشت پلانٹ کے کارکنوں کے لیے لڑتے ہیں — اور اس عمل میں، صنعت کے مستقبل کے لیے کام کرتے ہیں۔

ماہر سیاسیات ایڈولف ریڈ جونیئر اپنی تحریروں میں، نامور تعلیمی اور منتظم اجتماعی عمل کی اہمیت پر زور دیتے ہیں – تجریدات اور اشاروں کے بجائے مشترکہ مفادات کے ساتھ متحد ہونے پر۔ ریڈ لکھتے ہیں، “لوگوں کو اس طرح کے خدشات کے گرد اکٹھا کرنے پر توجہ مرکوز کرنے والی سیاست،” اور اجتماعی طور پر ان سے نمٹنے کے لیے ایک گاڑی تیار کرنا” “ایک ایسی سیاست ہے جو ہمارے مشترکات سے آگے بڑھتی ہے۔”

یہ وہ اخلاق ہے جو مارک لاریسن یونائیٹڈ فوڈ اینڈ کمرشل ورکرز کے ساتھ اپنے کام میں لاتے ہیں۔ یونین کے فوڈ پروسیسنگ، پیکنگ اور مینوفیکچرنگ کے ڈائریکٹر کے طور پر، لوریٹسن گوشت کی پیکنگ اور فوڈ پروسیسنگ میں تقریباً 260,000 کارکنوں کی نمائندگی کرتے ہیں ، اور پروسیسرز کے ساتھ گفت و شنید میں، پلانٹ کے دوسری نسل کے کارکن کے طور پر ان کے تجربات ہمیشہ ذہن میں رہتے ہیں۔ بیف پلانٹ ورکرز کے بیٹے لاریسن نے  سپینسر اور لائیوا میں بطور ہیم بونر  شروعات کی،   اور پھر چیروکی لووا میں واقع ولسن فوڈز میں کل فلور پہ کام کیا۔

یو ایف سی ڈبلیو لا ریسن ان مزاکرات میں کارکنوں کے لیے کامیاب ہوا ہے۔ 2020 میں، اس نے کارگل اور جے بی ایس سے چیت کی تاکہ امراض کے ابتدائی دنوں سے ہی “ہیرو پے” کی دفعات کو مستقل کیا جا سکے، اور تب سے، کچھ کارکنوں نے اپنی اجرت میں مزید اضافہ دیکھا ہے۔ مثال کے طور پر جے بی ایس کا گریلی، کولو، پلانٹ اب $21.75 اور $28.25 فی گھنٹہ کے درمیان ادائیگی کرتا ہے۔

اور اب، لاریسن کی نظریں ایک مختلف باہمی مقصد پر ہیں – گوشت پلانٹ کی محنت کشوں  کی وسیع ساکھ کو تبدیل کرنے کے لیے پروسیسرز کے ساتھ کام کرنا،  اور بھرتی اورمستقلی  کے مسائل کو حل کرنے کے لیے  جنہوں نے صنعت کو ایک نسل سے روک رکھا ہے۔  میٹنگ پلیس کے ساتھ گفتگو میں، لاریسن نے اپنے وژن کی تفصیلات بتائی۔

میٹنگ پلیس: میٹ پلانٹس میں آپ کے پہلے کے تجربات آپ کے موجودہ یونین کے کام کو مدد کرتے  ہیں؟

لاریسن: میں اکثر اس کے بارے میں سوچتا ہوں — وہ کام جو ہمارے اراکین حقیقت میں کرتے ہیں، اور ان کے لیے، ان کے خاندان [اور] کمیونٹی  کے لیے اس کا کیا مطلب ہے… ۔ اگرچہ اب میرے پاس یہ بلند و بالا اعزاز ہے، میری زندگی میں ایک ایسا موڑ تھا جہاں میں کل فلور پر کام کر رہا تھا [اور سوچا] ‘یہ میرا کیریئر ہے۔’ آپ اس کیریئر کو ممکنہ حد تک ایک تجربے کے طور پر کیسے بناتے ہیں؟ آج جو چیز مجھے حوصلہ دیتی ہے وہ یہ ہے کہ کام لوگوں کو قدر دیتا ہے۔ یہ صرف ایک تنخواہ نہیں ہے؛ یہ لوگوں کو قدر دیتا ہے، [تو] آپ اس کام کو بہترین کام کیسے بنا سکتے ہیں جو آپ ان ممبران کے لیے کر سکتے ہیں جو بہت مشکل حالات میں ہر روز کام پر جاتے ہیں؟

ایسی چیزیں بھی ہیں جو میٹ پیکنگ پلانٹ میں ملازم ہونے سے بہت پہلے ہوئی تھیں۔ میری والدہ اور میرے والد 1977 میں اسپینسر فوڈز میں کام کر رہے تھے، اور انہیں بند کر دیا گیا تھا۔  مجھے لگتا ہے کہ میں جونیئر ہائی یا ہائی اسکول میں تھا، لیکن وہ ایک لاک ڈاؤن کا شکار تھے، اور یہ تالہ بندی اور مزدوری کا تنازعہ سالوں تک جاری رہا۔

کام کرنے والے لوگوں پر اس قسم کی طاقت آزمائی  کو دیکھتے ہوئے جو صرف روزی کمانے کی کوشش کر رہے ہیں — اور یہ خاندانو  ں اور یہ کمیونٹیز کو کس طرح متاثر کرتا ہے — اور ایک نوجوان کے طور پر اس کے زیر اثر  زندگی گزارنے کا یقینی طور پر اثر ہوا…. جس وقت   تک یہ معاملہ طے ہوا تھا، میں اس یونین کے بین الاقوامی نمائندے کے طور پر خدمات انجام دے رہا تھا۔  اور میں  ان لوگوں میں سے ایک تھا جو اسپینسر، آئیووا کے مقامی یونین ہال میں نیشنل لیبر ریلیشنز بورڈکے تصفیے پر ووٹ دینے گئے تھے جس پر مزاکرات ہوئے ۔

میٹنگ پلیس: لیبر کے معاہدوں پر پروسیسرز کے ساتھ سودے بازی کرتے وقت آپ کا طریقہ کیا ہے؟

لاریسن: میرا نقطہ نظر اس صنعت کو سمجھنا ہے  جس کے ساتھ ہم کام کر رہے ہیں۔ میں بہت خوش قسمت ہوں کہ ہمارے مقامی یونین لیڈرز، اور ہمارے ساتھ کام کرنے والا عملہ، سبھی کو میٹ پیکنگ اور فوڈ پروسیسنگ کی صنعتوں میں وسیع علم ہے۔ یہ کوئی خلاصہ خیال نہیں ہے۔ یہ ایسی چیز ہے جو ہم سب جانتے ہیں، لیکن ہم صنعت کی معاشیات کو جانتے ہیں۔

میں [یہ بھی] مانتا ہوں کہ اگر ہم بات چیت کرتے رہیں — اور مشکل گفتگو — تو ہم وہ تصفیہ تلاش کر سکتے ہیں جو آجروں کے لیے اچھا اور ملازمین کے لیے اچھا ہے۔ لیکن، کچھ لائنیں ہیں– جنہیں  ہم عبور نہیں کرسکتے – اور پروسیسرز یہ جانتے ہیں ۔ اگر اس کا تعلق حفاظت اور صحت سے ہے، یا اگر اس کا تعلق انسانی حقوق اور اس جیسی چیزوں سے ہے، تو ہم ان کو عبور نہیں کریں گے، اور ہم یقینی بناتے ہیں کہ آجر  اس بات سے آگاہ ہوں۔ یہ  اعتماد تعلقات استوار کرنے اور طویل، سخت بات چیت سے آتا ہے۔

یہ سب سودے بازی کی طرف لے جاتا ہے، [اور] ہم ہمارے  اراکین کو کس چیز کی ضرورت ہے یہ نقطہ نظر اختیار کرتے ہیں، کیونکہ سوڈرٹن، پا. میں ایک رکن کو، ورتھنگٹن، من، یا میں کسی رکن سے بالکل مختلف چیز کی ضرورت ہو سکتی ہے،  ہم اس بات پر بہت زیادہ توجہ مرکوز کرتے ہیں کہ ہمارے اراکین کو کس چیز کی ضرورت ہے، ہمارے اراکین کے لیے کیا اہم ہے، اور معاہدے کے مذاکرات کے دوران ہم اسے کیسے درست کرتے ہیں…. یہ اس چیز کی طرف واپس چلا جاتا ہے جس سے میں نے شروع کیا تھا — ہم کس طرح کام کو کچھ  ایسا بناتے ہیں  کہ لوگ فخر سے دیکھ سکیں؟

میٹنگ پلیس: یو ایف سی ڈبلیو میٹ پلانٹس میں لیبر کو راغب کرنے کے مسئلے کو کیسے حل کر رہا ہے؟

لاریسن: ہمیں یاد رکھنا چاہئے کہ صنعت کو کورونا وائرس سے پہلے مزدوری کی برقراری اور کشش کا شدید مسئلہ تھا۔ لگتا ہے کہ کووڈ اس کشش  کو اور  زیادہ مشکل بنا دے گا – شاید برقرار رکھنے کی طرف نہیں، لیکن کشش کی طرف…. صنعت کو یہ سمجھنا ہو گا کہ کشش اور برقرار رکھنے کے لیے، اہم اقدامات ہیں جن کا لیا جانا ضروری ہے۔ .

سب سے پہلے ، آپ کو اچھی، ٹھوس اجرت فراہم کرنی ہوگی۔ اگر آپ میٹ پیکنگ پلانٹ میں کام کرنے کے لیے کارکنوں کو راغب کرنے جا رہے ہیں، تو اجرت اتنی پرکشش ہونی چاہیے کہ وہ کافی تعداد میں لوگوں کو اپنی طرف متوجہ کر سکے — یہ تعداد آپ کی ضرورت سے زیادہ کافی ہونی چاہیے ایک پلانٹ کو چلانے کے لیے ، کیونکہ ایسے لوگ ہیں جو اس کام کو کرنے کے لیے کٹ آؤٹ نہیں ہیں] اور بہت سے لوگ جلد ہی چھوڑ دیں گے۔

کشش کی بات کریں  تو، میں امید کرتا ہوں کہ اجرت میں اضافہ ہو گا جس پر ہم لوگوں کو متوجہ کرنے کے لیے ایک اچھے آلے کے طور پر بات چیت کرتے ہیں۔ تاہم، مجھے نہیں لگتا کہ اجرت  ایک واحد حل ہے  ۔   مجھے نہیں لگتا کہ ہم نے ابھی تک اس بہترین  مقام کو حاصل کیا ہے جو آئیووا کے سیوکس سٹی میں میٹ پیکنگ پلانٹ میں کام پر جانے کے لیے کسی کو راغب کرنے کے لیے واقعی کافی ہو گا۔  میرا مطلب ہے، ہمارے پاس ہمیشہ ایک تالاب میں کچھ ہوگا، لیکن ان نمبروں کے لیے جن کی ہمیں درحقیقت ضرورت ہے، میں سمجھتا ہوں کہ $18 کی بنیادی مزدوری کی شرح وہ نہیں ہے جہاں ہمیں ہونے کی ضرورت ہے، اور مجھے نہیں معلوم کہ یہ کہاں جا کے رکتی  ہے۔  ہو سکتا ہے، مستقبل قریب میں، وہ بنیادی مزدوری کی شرح تقریباً 20 ڈالر فی گھنٹہ تک پہنچ جائے۔

میٹنگ پلیس: اور کارکنوں کو برقرار رکھنے کے بارے میں کیا خیال ہے؟

بہت سی چیزیں ہیں جو ہونی ہیں۔ انڈسٹری کی ایک ساکھ ہے – اور یہ شہرت 80 اور 90 کی دہائی کے اوائل کی طویل، طویل لڑائیوں سے حاصل ہوئی – کہ یہ کام کرنے کے لیے کم اجرت والی، خطرناک جگہ ہے، اور ہمیں اجتماعی طور پر اسے ٹھیک کرنا ہوگا۔   جب میں کہتا ہوں ‘ہم’ — یہ  یو ایف سی ڈبلیو ہے، یہ مقامی یونینز ہیں اور یہ آجر ہیں… اس کام کو محفوظ بنانے کے لیے ہمیں کیا طریقہ اختیار کرنا چاہیے؟ اس میں کوئی شک نہیں کہ ہم کر سکتے ہیں، [اور] اور بھی بہت کچھ ہے جو ہم کر سکتے ہیں، اجتماعی طور پر، اسے کام کرنے کے لیے ایک محفوظ جگہ بنانے کے لیے۔

میں سوچتا ہوں جب میں نے میٹ پیکنگ پلانٹ میں کام کیا تھا — ‘کارپل ٹنل سنڈروم’ اور ‘دوہرائی جانے والی حرکت’ کی اصطلاحات عام نہیں تھیں جو آپ  سنتے ہوں۔ آپ کو وہاں سے ایک یا دو چوٹ آتی ہونگی ، لیکن یہ کوئی عام بات نہیں تھی۔ تب کیا فرق تھا ؟ آپ [آج کی] لائن کی رفتار کو دیکھتے ہیں، آپ عملے کی سطح کو دیکھتے ہیں، آپ ان تمام مختلف چیزوں کو دیکھتے ہیں  جو کردار ادا کرتی ہیں ۔ یہ اب اس مقام پر کیسے پہنچا جہاں لوگ بار بار حرکت کی  وجہ سے چوٹوں اور اس طرح کی چیزوں سے پریشان ہیں؟

پہلے دن سے 100% پر [ایک نیا ملازم] کام کرنے کے بجائے، آئیے انہیں نوکری کی تربیت دیں۔ آئیے انہیں بہت آہستہ تربیت دیں، آئیے انہیں سخت کریں اور انہیں کام کرنے کی عادت ڈالیں، اور پھر ہم انہیں مکمل [سطح] میں منتقل کر سکتے ہیں۔ صنعت کا مسئلہ یہ ہے کہ وہ ایک کارکن کو پکڑتے ہیں اور وہ چاہتے ہیں کہ وہ پہلے دن سے ہی  پوری رفتار سے چلیں، اور یہ جسمانی طور پر ناممکن ہے، کم از کم اس ٹرن اوور کی شرح کم سے کم ہے۔  یہ لوگ جو صفر دنوں سے ایک سال تک وہاں موجود ہیں — ان کے جسم بالکل ختم ہو چکے ہیں، اور یہی اس صنعت کی ساکھ ہے۔  اگر کوئی ایسا شخص ہے جو افرادی قوت میں آ رہا ہے، تو یہ وہ پہلی جگہ نہیں ہے جہاں وہ   کام پر جانا چاہیں گے۔ ہم اسے کیسے ٹھیک کریں گے؟ اس ساکھ کو تبدیل کریں۔

میٹنگ پلیس: وہ کون سے طریقے ہیں جن سے پروسیسر اس ساکھ کو تبدیل کرنے کے لیے کام کر سکتے ہیں؟

میں نے ابھی حال ہی میں آجروں میں سے ایک کے ساتھ اس پر  بات کی تھی۔ ایسا کرنے کا بہترین طریقہ یہ ہے کہ اسے فی الحال  صرف بہتر رویہ  یا احترام تک محدود کر دیا جائے۔  میں ہر وقت پلانٹس کا دورہ کرتا ہوں، اور میں پلانٹ کے مینیجرز کو فلور  پر جاتے ہوئے دیکھتا ہوں، اور ان میں سے اکثر کا اپنی افرادی قوت کے ساتھبراہ راست  تعلق ہوتا ہے۔  [ان کی] ایک دوسرے کے ساتھ گفتگو ہوتی  ہے، لوگ اس کے ساتھ مشغول  ہوتے  ہیں، اور لوگ اس پلانٹ مینیجر کو پسند کرتے ہیں۔

لیکن جب ہم انتظامیہ کے نچلے درجے میں پہنچ جاتے ہیں تو [یہ بدل جاتا ہے]۔ [پلانٹ کا مینیجر] اپنے نیچے والے شخص سے کہتا ہے، ‘ہمیں یہ پیداوار نکالنی ہے۔  ہمیں اسے ابھی نکالنا ہے۔’ اور پھر وہ سپرنٹنڈنٹ جنرل فورمین سے کہتا ہے، ‘ہمیں یہ پروڈکشن نکالنا ہے۔ ہمیں اسے ابھی حاصل کرنا ہے۔’ پھر وہ لائن سپروائزر کے پاس جاتے ہیں اور کہتے ہیں، ‘اس پروڈکٹ کو نکالنا ہے۔ ہمیں اب اسے حاصل کرنا ہے۔’ وہ تمام دباؤ کام کر رہا ہے، اور لائن سپروائزرز کے پاس اوسط کارکن کے علاوہ کوئی اور نہیں ہےجس پر وہ چینخے چلائے ۔

تربیت کی کچھ سطحیں ہونی چاہئیں جو انتظامیہ کے ذریعے پوری طرح نیچے تک آئے ، تاکہ  احترام اور تعلق کی ایک سطح ہو جو لائن سپروائزر، اور جنرل فورمین، اور اس لائن ورک کے ساتھ سپرنٹنڈنٹ کے ساتھ قائم ہو ، کیونکہ یہ  وہ لوگ ہیں جو [کارکنوں] کو باہر نکال دیتا ہے۔

ہم ہمیشہ اس شخص کے بارے میں کہانی سنتے ہیں جسے باتھ روم جانے کا موقع نہیں ملتا۔  ٹھیک ہے، یہ مسئلہ ایک چیز سے پیدا ہوتا ہے، اور وہ ہے پیدا وار کے دباؤ سےاور جب کارکن باتھ روم جانے کو کہتا ہے، [لائن سپروائزر] کہتا ہے، ‘میرے پاس ابھی آپ کی جگہ کوئی نہیں ہے، تو آپ کو صرف کامکرناپڑے گا۔ ٹھیک ہے، یہ حفاظت اور صحت کے علاوہ احترام کا سوال ہے۔ تربیت کی ایک مختلف سطح کی ضرورت ہے جہاں لوگ صرف ایک دوسرے کے ساتھ  دوبارہ انسانوں کی طرح سلوک کرسکیں۔ ایک دوسرے کے ساتھ ایسا سلوک کریں جیسے آپ اپنے ساتھ توقع کرتے ہیں ۔ آپ ان تینوں اجزاء کو ایک ساتھ رکھیں، مجھے لگتا ہے کہ ہم ساکھ کو بدل سکتے  ہیں۔

میٹنگ پلیس: میٹ پلانٹس میں آٹومیشن  پر یو ایف سی ڈبلیو کی پوزیشن کیا ہے؟

لاریسن: میں صنعت میں آٹومیشن کے متعارف ہونے کے طریقے کے بارے میں تھوڑا فکر مند ہوں…. خاص طور پر اس طرح کے اوقات میں جب بہت زیادہ افرادی قوت  نہیں ہوتی ہے، [پروسیسرز] اسے پلانٹ  اور کمیونٹیز سے یہ کہہ کر متعارف کراتے ہیں، ‘ ہم یہ ایک ٹکڑا لانے جا رہے ہیں اور کوئی بھی ملازمت سے محروم نہیں ہوگا۔ ہم انہیں یہیں پر کسی اور کام پر منتقل کریں گے۔

پھر کیا ہوتا ہے آپ کو آٹومیشن کے فوری اثرات نظر نہیں آتے۔ لہذا آپ کو پیچھے والے آئینے میں دیکھنا ہوگا اور دیکھنا ہوگا کہ آٹومیشن نے کیا کیا ہے۔  اور اس طرح اگر آپ پچھلے 10 سالوں میں کچھ پلانٹس  پر نظر ڈالیں، تو آپ دیکھ سکتے ہیں کہ ایک پلانٹ میں جہاں 1,200 لوگ کام کرتے تھے اور اب اچانک، آپ کے پاس 1,000 ہیں۔ تو آپ 200 نوکریاں کھو چکے ہیں۔ لیکن کسی نے اس پر توجہ نہیں دی کیونکہ یہ تھوڑی سی تبدیلی یہاں تھوڑی سی تبدیلی وہاں تھی۔

کچھ معاملات میں، آٹومیشن ایک اچھی چیز ہے۔ آپ اسے ایک محفوظ کام کی جگہ بناتے ہیں … لیکن اس کے ساتھ ہمیشہ ملازمت کا نقصان ہوتا ہے۔ ہمیں اسی پر توجہ دینی ہے، اور یہی چیز ہے جس سے مجھے تشویش لاحق ہے…. جب آپ کسی کمیونٹی سے 200 ملازمتیں نکالتے ہیں — مثال کے طور پہ ڈینیسن، آئیووا — پانچ سال کے عرصے میں، اس کا کمیونٹی پر حقیقی معاشی اثر پڑتا ہے۔

تو میں یہ دیکھنا چاہوں گا، جب ہمارے پلانٹس میں آٹومیشن آجائے گا، تو اس چیز پر بات چیت کی ضرورت ہے کہ کوئی خالص ملازمت کے نقصانات نہ ہوں۔  آٹومیشن کو پائیداری کے حصے کے طور پر دیکھنے کی ضرورت ہے، نہ کہ پیداوار بڑھانے اور مزدوری کی مجموعی لاگت کو کم کرنے کے طریقے کے طور پر۔  میں جانتا ہوں کہ یہ اس کا حصہ ہے، لیکن اس کا  ایک اور جزو ہونا ضروری ہے۔ یہ ہماری ایک سماجی ذمہ داری ہے۔ انڈسٹری کی کمیونٹیز کے لیے ایک سماجی ذمہ داری ہے جس میں وہ اس کمیونٹی کے  استحکام میں مدد کرتے ہیں۔

لہذا آٹومیشن اچھی ہو سکتی ہے اگر اسے صحیح مقصد کے لیے استعمال کیا جائے، لیکن ہمیں یہ دیکھنا ہوگا کہ یہ اس پلانٹ میں شامل ہر اسٹیک ہولڈر کو کیسے متاثر کرتا ہے۔ اگر نہیں، تو ہمارے پاس پلانٹ کے ارد گرد ایسا انفراسٹرکچر نہیں ہوگا جو اسے سہارا دے سکے۔  ہمارے پاس آبادی کا مسلسل نقصان ہوگا، جو پھر ملازمین کی کشش اور استحکام  رکھنے کے مسئلے کو بڑھاتا ہے۔  جب لوگ ان چھوٹے شہروں سے نکلتے ہیں، تو آپ کو کسی کو واپس آنے کے لیے راغب کرنا پڑتا ہے۔ اگر ہم اسے درست کرتے ہیں تو مقامی افرادی قوت کو راغب کرنا بہت آسان ہے۔  آٹومیشن کا استعمال ہمیں مارنے کے لیے نہ کریں۔

میٹنگ پلیس: آپ متبادل میٹ پروسیسنگ کو کیسے دیکھ رہے ہیں؟ پودوں  سے تیار کردہ  سے لے کر سیل کی کاشت تک، ان خالی جگہوں کو منظم کرنے کے بارے میں آپ کے کیا خیالات ہیں؟

لاریسن: ہم کسی بھی ایسے شخص کی نمائندگی کرتے ہیں جو پروٹین کی صنعت میں کام کرتا ہے، [لہذا] ہمارے یونین کے منتظمین متبادل گوشت کے کارکنوں کے ساتھ بات چیت کریں گے، جب بات یونین کو منظم کرنے کی ہو گی۔ میں اب بھی اسے انسانی حقوق کے مسئلے کے طور پر دیکھتا ہوں۔ لہذا اگر آلٹ میٹ کمپنیاں اور امپاسبل فوڈز لوگ اس پروٹین انڈسٹری میں کام کرنا  چاہتے ہیں… انہیں لوگوں کو ادائیگی کرنے اور ان کے ساتھ احترام کے ساتھ برتاؤ کرنے کی ضرورت ہے۔ انہیں اچھے فوائد پیش کرنے کی ضرورت ہے۔ اور انہیں ایک پائیدار ملازمت پیش کرنے کی ضرورت ہے۔

یہ سب انسانی حقوق کے نقطہ نظر سے شروع ہوتا ہے … دنیا دوسری جنگ عظیم سے باہر آئی، اور انہوں نے اس بات کا مطالعہ کیا کہ کیا ہوا اور کیا غلطی ہوئی ۔  اقوام متحدہ نے انسانی حقوق کا عالمی اعلامیہ جاری کیا، [اور] ان عالمی حقوق میں سے ایک یہ حق ہے کہ لوگ انتقامی کارروائی کے خوف کے بغیر ٹریڈ یونین میں شامل ہو سکیں … تو جیسا کہ آپ اس پر پیچھے مڑ کر دیکھ رہے ہیں… میں  متبادل گوشت  سے وابستہ بہت لوگوں کو  جانتا ہوں، [اور] وہ یہ سوچنا پسند کرتے ہیں کہ وہ باقی سب سے زیادہ ترقی پسند ہیں۔ وہ ہمیشہ ترقی پسند رہتے ہیں جب تک کہ پیسہ کمانے کی بات نہیں آتی ہے، اور وہ انسانی حقوق کی اتنی ہی تیزی سے خلاف ورزی کریں گے جیسےکوئی اور کرتا  ہو۔

ہمارا کام اس بات کو یقینی بنانا ہے کہ وہ اس سے بچ نہ سکیں… ، جب آپ کے کام کی بات آتی ہے ٹریڈ یونین میں شامل ہونے کے انسانی حق کا استعمال سب سے بنیادی چیز ہے ۔ باقی سب کچھ اسی سے نکلتا ہے — اچھی اجرت، اچھے فوائد، ایک مستحکم افرادی قوت کی جگہ۔ یہ سب انسانی حقوق کے استعمال سے نکلتا ہے۔ تو اس کی حفاظت کی ضرورت ہے۔ اور اس طرح جب پلانٹ پر مبنی گوشت سے وابستہ  لوگوں کی بات آتی ہے، اگر آپ اس صنعت کا حصہ بننے جا رہے ہیں، تو ہم آئیں گے۔ ہم آپ کے کارکنوں سے بات کریں گے۔ اور ہم توقع کرتے ہیں کہ آپ ان کے انسانی حقوق کی خلاف ورزی نہیں کریں گے۔

POSTER: “what we fear as women”, we fight as a union! International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

“what we fear as women”, we fight as a union!

The phrase “what we fear as women” comes from a powerful report by the Al-Jazeera Investigative Unit on sexual abuse and violence against women in UK universities. The sexual harassment, abuse and violence described in the report and the exploitation of the institutionalized vulnerability of women exposes the fears that women workers experience in workplaces everyday.

One of the reasons women workers face violence and abuse at work is the the institutionalized and systemic vulnerability that pervades workplaces. Based on our work with women union leaders and members in hotels, restaurants, food processing and agriculture over the past four years, we identified different kinds of institutionalized vulnerability, both physical and economic.

Physical vulnerability was experienced in terms of isolation and travel. Isolation could mean situations in which there are only a few women among many men in a workplace, leaving them vulnerable. Or where women were working alone in fields or plantations, or as sales workers on the road visiting homes or offices. Travel referred to vulnerability during travel to and from work. This included crowded mixed public transport; crowded mixed transport provided by the employer; being compelled to hitch-hike to and from work; or walking long distances to work in fields or to collect water.

The economic vulnerability we discussed included low wages or poverty wages that make it impossible for women to remove themselves from violence. This applies both to violence in the workplace and home. Where women on poverty wages are already vulnerable and cannot get another job, they are unable to achieve the economic independence needed to escape domestic violence. Several of our women union leaders argued that a decent wage or a “living wage” negotiated through collective bargaining can contribute to reducing women workers’ economic vulnerability and help to eliminate the violence arising from that vulnerability.

Our members spoke of a range of different kinds of economic vulnerability, including: debt/bonded labour and the violence women face as “property”; widows denied access to land rights and government benefits; women workers denied the family benefits received by men, especially housing and wages in kind (e.g. essential food such as rice, grain) on plantations; recruitment practices; and precarious employment arrangements.

Sexual harassment and abuse in applying for and getting jobs, passing probation, passing performance appraisals, securing permanent jobs, or renewing temporary contracts is rampant. This is because tremendous power over the job security, livelihoods and promotion of women workers is concentrated in the hands of men in management and supervisory positions. This power is regularly abused and there are often no effective measures in place to prevent this.

Despite claims of ‘zero tolerance’ for discrimination and harassment, most employers – including some of the biggest transnational food, beverage and agricultural companies in the world – do nothing to address the nexus of economic vulnerability and the abuse of power. Instead, most employers defend the use of precarious employment (insecure jobs based on casual, temporary, labour hire, or outsourcing) in economic terms. It’s all about flexibility and efficiency. Yet insecure jobs are a fundamental source of economic vulnerability for women workers, leaving them exposed to the harassment and abuse of the men who will decide whether or not their contracts are renewed. It is a fundamental source of the fear women workers face.

It is our role as trade unions to take action to ensure that women no longer face that fear. We must take action to stop violence against women. But we must also take action as unions to eliminate one of the most important sources of institutionalized fear at work: insecurity and fear arising from recruitment, precarious employment, and insecure jobs. 

We must expose the power and vulnerability behind “what we fear as women” and we must fight it as a union. 

Please join us on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women on November 25 to call for greater action by unions. And every day going forward, let’s make it happen. Our union, our power must be used to protect and support women speaking out, women working without fear, with all workers standing together, to STOP violence against women.

Hidayat Greenfield, Regional Secretary

What we fear as women-English PDF

Women working without fear-English PDF